Oceanic Oceanpro BCD Review

The Oceanic Ocean Pro BCD is what would generally be considered as an entry level BCD. This BCD has been in the Oceanic line for quite a while although it may have gone by a few different names, it has largely stayed the same with each new generation adding convenient features. Now the true name of the BCD is the Oceanpro 1000D previous generations also went by just the Oceanpro, and although it was an attempt to break from this mold I also believe that the Cruise BCD was also the same. If you are on a budget or a new diver looking to get your first BCD the Oceanic Oceanpro bcd is a great starting point if your not ready to make the jump to back inflate.

Lets talk about features:

  • This is a jacket style BCD made of denier nylon, which is very common in BCD materials, the great part about this is that if the bcd is punctured it can be patched quite easily with some aqua seal (I have had to do this a few times).
  • It has the standard Oceanic Inflator, right shoulder dump and rear dump, all of these additional dumps have pull strings with balls on the end making them very easy to find even with gloves. The attachments for the dumps are also easy to clean with no tools required to remove them which is something I am always grateful for, especially when a student gets sand in theirs.
  • Oceanic QLR4 Pocket system. This is one the largest differences from other brands which is the quick release weight pocket system. They use a hidden buckle that is behind the pocket to help avoid debris, and a handle that i believe is silicone/plastic to pull and release the system. In my experience with Oceanic BCD’s this is a very reliable system if they are locked in properly and not over loaded beyond their capacity. Because the handles do stick out slightly they can get caught on things like kelp but the buckle system is sturdy enough not to pull free too easily. These pockets can hold up to 10 lbs each for a total of 20 lbs of dumpable weight.
  • Storage pockets: as is common with jacket style BCD’s it has two large zipper pockets with moderate pull tabs that make it fairly accessible, a little harder to access with gloves, but like any other jacket BCD how inflated the bcd is will affect the access and storage in the pockets so be careful putting fragile things in the pockets. But plenty of space for a light, slate, reel, or SMB for those that want to have them but not have them dangling off them.
  • D-rings, the Oceanpro sports 8 plastic d-rings strategically placed for the most convenient use. I have not encountered any broken d-rings they seem to be sturdy, comparing my much older Oceanpro BCD it has much fewer and I find at times not able to clip things were I want, but the new design has plenty of options.
  • Trim Pockets, this bcd like more and more has trim pockets attached to the bladder on the back of the bcd on either side of the tank strap. They each can accommodate 5 lbs for a total of 10 lbs of trim. They are velcro pockets and non dumpable so I suggest being very conservative with the amount of weight you are placing in them, they should not be holding the majority of your weight.
  • Adjustable Cumber bun and stomach strap. One of the things that most divers don’t realize is that the cumber bun and stomach straps on most Oceanic BCD’s are adjustable. This is great for bcd’s in rentals that may need to fit a variety of sized divers. It also allows a new diver to easily customize the fit to their personal needs and avoid overly tight or loose straps. The adjustment is behind the divers back so it is best adjusted before the tank is attached.
  • Adequate lift capacity. So like many jacket style bcd’s and bcd’s in general the lift capacity is going to depend on the size of the bcd. Smaller bcd’s will have less than larger bcd’s, for the Oceanpro this range from xs to xxl is about 20 lbs of lift to 48 lbs of lift. This could be an important factor playing into your choice of diving, I have seen many times that divers do not take into account the lift of their bcd’s and over load them with weight in their integrated pockets, also forgetting the buoyancy of the tank and finding it impossible to stay afloat at the surface. Keep in mind your exposure suit will add buoyancy but if you take your bcd off at the surface it might not stay there. Be sure to check your weight when diving and avoid overweighting yourself.
  • Molded tank cradle/backpack, Most bcd’s will often have some sort of plastic backplate of sorts to give the bcd rigidity and structure for the tank to press up against for securing it. these are light weight usually and often have a handle to make it easier to carry the bcd. On the Oceanpro bcd there is a pad for diver comfort and on the back above the tank strap what I like to call a cheater strap which is used to help set the tank hight when setting it up and an additional strap around the tank valve incase the primary strap comes loose. This is more common in newer bcd’s and a very handy feature for keeping the bcd height on the tank consistent. The base of this cradle is also where the cumber bun and stomach strap are adjusted from.
  • The most important feature of course of any bcd and the one that I believe many care most about is the price the Oceanic Oceanpro BCD comes in at $479.95.

Overall I believe that this is a great starting BCD for any diver, it is a reasonable price, has plenty of features, storage and very durable. It can be easily repaired and does not need any special tools to clean in all of those nooks and crannies that might build up salt or sand over time. I have been dealing with these BCD’s for 10 years and wouldn’t have any other BCD as a rental. I can fix almost any issue, at a dive site, the weight pockets are reliable and don’t come loose like some other brands (I find a lot of lost weight pockets almost never Oceanic). So if you are looking for a starter BCD consider the Oceanic Oceanpro it may surprise you.

Advertisement

Which Scuba Brand Makes the Best Equipment?

This may be one of the difficult answers to truly answer in the dive industry because it is subjective and always going to to be driven by personal opinion.  Each dive shop will likely claim that the brand they carry has the most reliable, highest quality equipment that puts others to shame, and they will say this to sell the equipment.  Some dive shops are unfortunately just like used car lots saying whatever they can to up sell you to the next item.  Now most dive shops are not massive and it is impossible for any one shop to carry every brand, so most pick one, two or even three primary brands.  The other dilemma is the actual number of brands I am going to focus on a few of the largest names including, Scubapro, Aqualung, Mares, and Huish Outdoors (Oceanic, Zeagle, Suunto, Atomic, Hollis).  You should be able to find at least one of these brands at any dive shop that you may visit, there are others like Sherwood, Seac, and Tusa but are probably not going to be the primary brand especially for BCD’s, regulators, and Computers.  Here is a brief overview of what to expect from each brand.

imagesScubaPro

Scubapro is probably one of the most recognizable names in the industry right now and has some equipment that stands out.  The first thing to know about Scubapro is that it is most likely going to be the most expensive option.  They make a very high quality product but they have little to offer in terms of middle of the road pricing.  Scubapro equipment is either the more expensive low end, or the most expensive high end.  Now they do produce a very high quality product that is rigorously tested and reliable but you will pay a premium.  Now in terms of equipment BCD’s are really where Scubapro shines in my opinion they have many options with multiple styles and prices ranging from about $450 on the low end to over $1000 on their high end bcd. Bcd’s are also were there is going to be the largest variation between these brands. While Scubapro does make a quality computer and regulator I feel you only have two choices for each very high end or low end no middle ground, and while this is true for the bcd’s there are enough options to minimize that gap.

imagesAqualung

Aqualung is a company that has been around since the beginning and may be one of the most recognizable brands.  In terms of over all pricing Aqualung is a little more spread evenly with very budget friendly options especially with regulators and computers, and high end regs that don’t knock the wind out of you when you hear the price.  In terms of their BCD’s they have the I3 inflator system that I am not personally sold on but have met  a number of people that are very happy with it.  The regulators are what really stand out for me, the dive computers are actually almost identical to oceanic dive computers because they purchase from the same company oceanic does.  The regulators provide a large variety of options for divers on a budget and divers looking for a high quality versatile regulator.

maresMares

Mares is a very large brand that most don’t realize is as big as it is.  Owned by the Head company and this partnership also owns SSI the training agency.  Now this is where i find it hard to hide my opinion because in terms of dive equipment I am not overly impressed with anything from Mares.  I am not a fan of the quick disconnect pockets on their bcd’s, their regulators are underwhelming, they function but I would  prefer another brand first, and their computers are functional. I would have to say that of everything Mares I would  have one of their low budget computers as a starter or backup.  Mares in general is a great starter equipment company but I have not seen the value in their equipment beyond that.  Its not that I think that they make bad gear I just believe that these other brands make better gear.

huish outdoorsHuish Outdoors (Oceanic, Suunto, Zeagle, Atomic, Hollis)

Huish Outdoors is a Unique situation and in a dive shop you are not going to see the Huish logo most likely but they do own all of these brands, (at least an exclusive distributor for Suunto).  One of the reasons I wanted to include Huish is because I like the fact that they have accumulated brands that specialize.  Now for the most part each of these brands has a primary focus, most of them do dabble in other areas but are known for one primary thing.  Zeagle is known for BCD’s, Suunto for Computers, Hollis for Regulators, Atomic for Regulators, and Oceanic dabbles evenly in all three but has been known as an innovator for computers for many years.  Unlike the other three brands above that are distributing R&D among all aspects of equipment Huish has brands that they have acquired that have a particular focus.  Most of their equipment is reasonably priced With the exception of Atomic they make very high end regulators on par with Scubapro.  If you get something from one of these brands especially in their wheelhouse you know it will be very high quality for the cost.

In the end it is a personal choice which brand is best it may be situational, when picking a brand it is important to consider the long term, how easily can I service this equipment, is there a shop that I can take this equipment to if I have an issue.  I this equipment going to fit the style of diving that I intend to do and fit my personal budget.  The key to all of this is to determine your needs, figure out what features you want and then talk to your local dive shop professional because in all honesty no matter which brand you ultimately decide on you will have quality gear.  You just want to make sure you are comfortable in that equipment and how to properly use and care for the equipment.

So in order to avoid giving a BS answer that there is no best equipment I am going to break it down into tiers High, middle, and low, in terms of price and among those name brands for my preferred for BCD, Regulator, and computer.  Now keep in mind that all of these brands make quality equipment and the ultimate choice comes down to personal preference in features and access, talk with your local dive shop cause they will likely be the ones servicing your equipment.

High:
BCD: Scubapro
Reg: Atomic
Computer: Suunto/Scubapro (the G2 is a pretty amazing computer)

Middle:
BCD: Zeagle
Reg: Aqualung/Oceanic
Computer: Oceanic/Aqualung

Low:
BCD: Oceanic/Mares
Reg: Oceanic/Aqualung
Computer: Mares/Aqualung/Oceanic

What Does it Cost to Get Scuba Certified?

Taking the plunge and getting certified for many people is scary not only because it is a new experience but also because of the cost, So what does it cost to get certified?  This is one of the greatest questions in the diving industry, and most commonly asked in any dive shop.  No matter which agency you get certified through Padi, SSI, Naui, to name a few, all of them are providing the same fundamental training and skills.  The differences will be in the format that these skills and how the information is taught.  Since it is safe to say that all open water certifications no matter the agency are equivalent lets break down the what the general expected cost of an Open Water certification would be.

There are many ways to break down these cost and different shops and different agencies will vary in their prices but this is a guide to provide a general idea of how much it should cost to get scuba certified.  These cost will be broken down into training (Classroom, Pool, and Open Water dives), Materials, Rental, and Personal gear.  Now with all of these they will vary from shop to shop for training, rentals and personal equipment and agency to agency for materials, so i will be providing a general estimate for each of these because it may differ at your local dive shop.

scuba trainingTraining is the most important part of the certification and will be what truly molds the experience of getting certified.  It is the personal touch that the instructor provides that will shape your experience and path as a diver.  The ability to provide clear instruction and knowledge for the students will leave a huge impact on new divers.  This is where the true value of shopping around for your certification will matter.  Finding a shop and instructor that are devoted to providing you the student with the best experience possible.  As for the price this is the portion of the cost that the instructors themselves are paid from.  Some shops will split the cost of classroom/ pool and open water dives, and others will provide an all in pricing.  For the aspect of training expect anywhere from $200 to $350 to cover the cost of training (classroom/pool/open water dives).

Materials are completely determined by the certification agency and can vary depending padi materialson what format of program you are taking, accelerated programs will be more costly and allow students to complete a majority of classroom portion of the program at home.  The three largest and most recognizable agencies Padi, SSI, and Naui materials will range from $75-$189.  With these materials they are at this point in time offered as printed books to study or online digital material, SSI provides only digital material, while Padi and Naui offer printed material or digital e-learning.

rental gearRentals are something that are absolutely necessary for open water dives unless the new diver has decided to purchase their own BCD, regulator, tanks, weights, and wetsuit.  These items to purchases would quickly reach a couple thousand dollars, most new divers will rent these items for their certification, once again rentals will depend on the shop and what kind of gear is needed for the dive, wetsuits will depend on the temperature of the water, the other items will be necessary regardless.  Normal expected rental cost for this equipment should be expected around $60-$150.  Some shops may provide rental packages that include other gear like mask snorkel, fins that may affect this price.

Most dive shops will request or require new students to purchase their own personal gear, Mask, Snorkel, Booties, Fins, and Gloves.  This is because these items are a personal personal gearfit gear that will drastically affect your diving experience if they do not fit properly.  Once again these items will vary drastically in price and some shops will offer student discounts to help promote the purchase.  In general expect at minimum $150 for all of your personal gear and price can go up to as high as $500.  Keep in mind this is equipment necessary for scuba, made to a very high quality and made to last when taken care of properly.

In the end the price is hard to give an exact number, and when you ask a dive shop employee that is why they will hesitate to answer because there are many factors that can affect the total cost. The lowest to expect when getting certified not including personal equipment would be somewhere around $400 and the highest could be somewhere around $700 with a majority of them somewhere in between.  With this being said average price all in to get certified will be somewhere in the range of $600.  Personal equipment is where the larges variance in price will be in terms of personal choice, the Training, rental, and materials will be pre determined by the shop.  The most important thing to consider will be what will work best for you, dive shops and dive professionals will provide advice for what the best route to take is for the goals you wish to meet.

Zeagle Stiletto BCD Review

Zeagle is a brand that is well known for its high end equipment, especially the BCD’s.  Up until recently Zeagle has been known for BCD’s being exclusively back inflate, recently Zeagle has released their first vest inflation bcd the Halo. Most of the time when divers hear the name Zeagle they think of the Ranger, and Zena a women’s specific bcd,  but this review looks to evaluate one of the lesser known classics from Zeagle the Stiletto.

The Zeagle Stiletto is a back inflation BCD that has the Zeagle patented rip chord weight system.  Most people are more familiar with Zeagle’s ranger BCD and the Stiletto is a slimmed down version of the standard ranger, with a less heavy duty bladder.  The general Specs for the Stiletto are as follows:

Dry Weight: 7.4 lbs
Lift: 35lbIMG_3637
Weight capacity:
24lb Ripcord System
16lb Rear weight pockets

Like many of the Zeagle BCD lines the stiletto has interchangeable and replaceable parts including cummerbund, shoulders and back pad.  The double tank straps are moveable to accommodate shorter tanks and the rear weight pockets can be removed and replaced if deemed necessary.  I found these adjustable options on the Stiletto to allow me to customize a standard bcd to fit my personal preferences.

There are Two key features that in my opinion put the Zeagle line of BCD’s above others.  The first is the iconic rip chord weight system that allows for the quick release of integrated weights with a single hand pull.  Many other bcd designs use a dual pocket release system requiring the user to have both hands free to release all integrated weights.  The other unique feature for Zeagle bcd’s are the quick screw inflator with standard hose attachment.  This feature allows for the user to unscrew the bcd inflator and attach a hose in order to flush salt and grime out of the bcd bladder more easily, and replace the bcd inflator when repairs are needed.

Pros:

  • Easily adjustable parts for custom fit
  • Adequate amounts of D-rings
  • Rip chord weight systems
  • Easily replaceable inflator
  • Inflator hose attachment
  • Double tank strap
  • Removable rear weight pouches
  • Custom color options (also available for Ranger and Zena)

Cons:

  • Smaller Lift Capacity (35 lbs) Adequate for warm water diving but might not be enough for some instances of cold water diving.
  • Mesh weight Pouches (sold separately from BCD)
  • Re-lacing the weight pocket system is not intuitive
    ZGLWP10.jpg

My larges problem comes down to the mesh weight pouches not being included with the BCD.  Although they are not absolutely necessary they do come in handy with using smaller increment weights mostly 1 lb weights, especially bullet weights because they can fall through the rip chord pockets without the mesh pouch.  the pouches do come in handy when carrying weights especially if you are using the same amount of weight and transporting them often.

The weight pocket system despite being very convenient and reliable, is not very intuitive when re-lacing the rip chord system.  There have been numerous encounters with divers that unfamiliar with the system laced the rip chord system improperly making the system ineffective and dangerous to use.  But because dropping ones weights is not a common occurrence so I do not see this as a big issue as long as proper instruction is given when the BCD is purchased.

Overall this is a great mid to high quality bcd compared to those on the current market.  Retail price starts around $630.

 

 

Zeagle Scope Mono Review

The Scope line of mask from Zeagle is their first ever release of any masks.  While Zeagle is most well known for their high quality rugged BCD’s and along with the recent release of the Zeagle Recon Fins they have broken ground into the soft gear market.

The Scope line of dive masks includes the Dual and Mono masks.  The obvious difference between the two is the number of lenses, the dual is a two lens mask while the mono is a single lens mask.  Some of the features of each mask include:

Scope Dual:Zeagle Scope Mono

  • Replaceable lenses
  • Color lens frame kit options
  • Standard silicone straps

Scope Mono:

  • Frameless mask design
  • Low volume
  • Elastic soft ski goggle style strap standard

The straps for the masks can be interchangeable using a Allen screw design similar to the Zeagle recon fin straps.

Now while I have been fortunate enough to test both mask I have much more experience with the Scope Mono Mask.  While mask are a personal fit everything said is subject to my opinion and personal experience with the mask and may be different for another person.

What I like about the Zeagle Scope Mono mask,  because of the single lens design this mask provides a very wide field of view giving the person waring it a very open feeling for a black silicone mask.  There is a very wide set nose pocket on the mask providing extra space for those with larger noses despite the single lens design, I have a moderately large nose and found only making contact from the bridge when I excessively suck air from the mask or am unable to equalize the airspace.  For those with excessively large noses i would recommend the Scope Dual.  I was skeptical of the mask strap but found it fairly easy to adjust and with the amount of stretch never felt excessively tight.

Problems I have with the Zeagle Scope mono, the first issue i noticed with the mask was that it was relatively narrow for my face.  I was still able to get the mask to seal on my face but did feel narrow at least compared to my goto mask the Oceanic Shadow.  I also found that with the Scope Mono if i had neglected to shave for a couple of days the mask would begin to leak excessively, this was a annoying problem during a dive but easy to avoid once i figured out the cause.  Another issue that was easily remedied was the attached snorkel keeper on the mask strap.  Fortunately the snorkel keeper is removable unlike some other ones on similarly designed mask straps.  I found all of these problem to be minor issues and easily dealt with.

Overall I very much enjoyed using the Zeagle Scope Mono mask, it is a comfortable low volume mask with a wide field of view that had a surprisingly comfortable strap for diving with and without a hood.  This is definitely a mask that I will be adding to my active rotation of mask.

 

Check out the Video Review on Youtube Click Here